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  • #46
    Originally posted by Sunburnt1 View Post
    Like I said I will be extremely disappointed if the true solve is dechypiring a encrypted code. It almost seems that way to me at times. That is not straight forward at all. Even breaking words apart , ungrammically hyponating ( Forrest said something about bending a word) and mispronouncing seems like your messing with the poem. But I key hint was to read the poem slow. To me that means those last 2 or added punctuation is needed.
    Begin It wwwh and take It....( take a object or vessle to the canyon)
    Begin it wwwh and take it in.... ( view the canyon and scenery)
    are 2 different ways to read that sentence. There are no rules to this game. . But I take ff's comments as facts. No codes or ciphers.
    Some searchers overrate the complexity of the search. Knowing about head pressures, foot pounds, acre feet, bible verses, Latin, cubic inches, icons, fonts, charts, graphs, formulas, curved lines, magnetic variation, codes, depth meters, riddles, drones or ciphers, will not assist anyone to the treasure location, although those things have been offered as positive solutions. Excellent research materials are TTOTC, Google Earth, and/or a good map.” (Dal’s Blog/ Scrapbook)
    Sunburnt1: I'm interested in your explanation for the phonetic misspellings of all of the following individuals by Forrest (keeping in mind that spelling someone's name wrong is generally considered rude):

    TTOTC pg. 130: Richard Wetherill misspelled Wetherell
    TFTW pg. 231 : Charles Lindbergh misspelled Lindberg
    OUAW pg. 183: Orson Welles misspelled Wells
    SB 7: Georgia O’Keeffe misspelled O’Keefe
    SB 104: Jonathan Winters misspelled Johnathan
    SB 104: John Connolly misspelled Connelly
    SB 104: Hal Wallis misspelled Wallace
    SB 104: Sam Elliott and Katharine Ross misspelled Elliot and Katherine
    SB 104: Doc Severinsen misspelled Severson
    SB 177: Neil Armstrong misspelled Neal
    SB 190: J.C. Penney misspelled Penny
    MW Featured Question (4/12/2016): Wallace Beery misspelled Berry

    This is not an exhaustive list. Before you answer, consider that in general Forrest spells pretty well -- ignoring the hundreds of compound noun mistakes which is a separate topic.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by wwwamericana View Post
      Perhaps if we eat Pi,
      we will never die.

      Just something to think about......

      Click image for larger version

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      No offense intended, but d'ya ever think you might be overly concerned with immortality?
      For what it's worth, I honestly believe that you are a good person, helpful and useful to many others . . . thanks for that.
      And technically, as long as we continue to eat, we'll continue to live. How 'bout that!

      Comment


      • #48
        I could never find a systematic pattern to the misspellings and errors. Which all seem on purpose. It does almost seems like you need to add letters, take away or change letters in the poem. Because ff did it in his stories. But I think that's been tried so many times. And there might not be a correct codex style formula. Each clue is a geographic place. Each place is definable. Maybe all you need is the right synonym to each clue. I think it would almost be comical if the map needed was a overcolorful campground map that are made for children.

        Comment


        • #49
          Hi Sunburnt1: thanks for being one soul who even read my post. I question why I bother sharing such data because clearly no one cares, which tells me no one is paying attention to detail and is just reading the poem like it's some treasure walk travelogue. ;-)

          So to answer YOUR question, since you were kind enough to even post a reply: homonyms. Every proper name misspelling can be pronounced the same: just like "knowlege".

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Zapster View Post
            Hi Sunburnt1: thanks for being one soul who even read my post. I question why I bother sharing such data because clearly no one cares, which tells me no one is paying attention to detail and is just reading the poem like it's some treasure walk travelogue. ;-)

            So to answer YOUR question, since you were kind enough to even post a reply: homonyms. Every proper name misspelling can be pronounced the same: just like "knowlege".
            I'm sorry Zapster; I, like I'm sure many members here, try to read almost every post; unless the poster is someone who never says anything of value then I generally ignore them and read what I think are more valuable posts. Please don't take offense if you don't get replies to your posts; it might mean that your post speaks for itself. Welcome to the forum.
            Chase Theme Song: The Good Ship Lollipop
            Rule #X: Trust everyone without question even if they're on your blind side - consider yourself uninformed {T - 1:09 and counting .... 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8...}

            Comment


            • #51
              Thanks for the definition. Homonym. I did not know the word for that definition. That's what I was trying to say. That's why I think you need to read it slowly.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                Sunburnt1: I'm interested in your explanation for the phonetic misspellings of all of the following individuals by Forrest (keeping in mind that spelling someone's name wrong is generally considered rude):

                TTOTC pg. 130: Richard Wetherill misspelled Wetherell
                TFTW pg. 231 : Charles Lindbergh misspelled Lindberg
                OUAW pg. 183: Orson Welles misspelled Wells
                SB 7: Georgia O’Keeffe misspelled O’Keefe
                SB 104: Jonathan Winters misspelled Johnathan
                SB 104: John Connolly misspelled Connelly
                SB 104: Hal Wallis misspelled Wallace
                SB 104: Sam Elliott and Katharine Ross misspelled Elliot and Katherine
                SB 104: Doc Severinsen misspelled Severson
                SB 177: Neil Armstrong misspelled Neal
                SB 190: J.C. Penney misspelled Penny
                MW Featured Question (4/12/2016): Wallace Beery misspelled Berry

                This is not an exhaustive list. Before you answer, consider that in general Forrest spells pretty well -- ignoring the hundreds of compound noun mistakes which is a separate topic.
                I do not own TFTW. I'm guessing the misspelled Orson Welles is on pg. 183 of TFTW not OUAW? OUAW ends on pg. 179.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by SteveandhisdogBillie View Post

                  I do not own TFTW. I'm guessing the misspelled Orson Welles is on pg. 183 of TFTW not OUAW? OUAW ends on pg. 179.
                  Sorry Steve: yes, TFTW not OUAW. That misspelling is particularly obvious because it is spelled correctly in the picture immediately to the right of the text.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                    All Forrest was saying was that some people have used such methods successfully to a degree. But the alternative methods are not required. What are people gonna say if finder says his neighbor Sam's dog told him where to search for treasure ?
                    I would say that Sam is a good neighbor.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                      Hi Sunburnt1: thanks for being one soul who even read my post. I question why I bother sharing such data because clearly no one cares, which tells me no one is paying attention to detail and is just reading the poem like it's some treasure walk travelogue. ;-)

                      So to answer YOUR question, since you were kind enough to even post a reply: homonyms. Every proper name misspelling can be pronounced the same: just like "knowlege".
                      So Severinsen is pronounced like Severson. Now I've heard everything.
                      Last edited by Old Pilot; 08-11-2019, 12:58 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                        So Severinsen is pronounced like Severson. Now I've heard everything.
                        Sure Severinsen could be pronounced Severson.
                        But why would Yashawai be pronounced Jesus ?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                          So Severinsen is pronounced like Severson. Now I've heard everything.
                          Nice double entendre. ;-) Of the 12 examples, yes -- not a solid homophone. But perhaps pretty close in a Temple Texas drawl?

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            HUCKLEBERRY. https://youtu.be/YVEgxYnQIxw

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              IT' S https://youtu.be/bZK6PUvOqSA

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Zapster, I appreciate your thoughtful and interesting posts even if sometimes I myself need more dots to make the connection to a poem solution. I'm getting the idea that ell's are important in your solution; beyond that, I'm not quite sure. The only thing that comes to mind is maybe letters in the poem in an L shape, like 2-3 down and 2-3 across, that create words "not of the poem but in the poem"?

                                My own estimation of FF's spelling ability, based on handwritten letters in the Bill Griggs collection, is that he is more of an average speller, and IMO the spelling errors of names that you cite are fairly common and understandable. I keep in mind that there are many folks who may not be the best at spelling or grammar but sure know how to tell an interesting story and get their point across with an economy of words, often with humor and a poetic elegance. So I'm not the biggest fan of spelling errors as deliberate or the source of hints. Now, name substitution involving ell's that you've pointed out might be a different story. FWIW and best wishes!

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