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Reconciling ‘Take it in the canyon down’ with ‘ No paddle up your creek’.

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  • Reconciling ‘Take it in the canyon down’ with ‘ No paddle up your creek’.

    So, I have pondered this a lot and thought I would ask for your take on this. Here is the reason for asking the question.

    Forrest tells us to ‘take it in the canyon down’. Now ‘down’ to me means that I go from one elevation at WWWH and take the canyon down, not far, but too far to walk, to a place, the HOB, that will be lower in elevation. Down meaning down to a lower location. If a creek is involved in the canyon this would be downstream.

    From here, it is no place for the meek and there will be no paddle ‘up your creek’. When do you quit going down the canyon, which I assume also means down the creek as water flows downhill, and take a turn to be going ‘up your creek’? Does this mean a turn to travel up a dry creek, a draw or somewhere where you are not able to get in the creek to travel by water? Do you actually quit going downstream and start going upstream?

    In traveling on waterways there is a difference between upstream and downstream. Is Forrest telling us to take a turn from traveling in the canyon down to go up a creek or draw where you will need no paddle?

    What do you think?


  • #2
    I think take it in the canyon down, not far but too far to walk is how f gets everyone to leave the vicinity of wwwh in the wrong direction. There's no move to be made from that.
    Last edited by Mr hand; 07-21-2019, 05:36 AM.

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    • #3
      Yes, but it gives us a place to begin leaving WWWH - taking the canyon - which direction? - down. And later as 'the end is ever drawing nigh; There'll be no paddle up your creek, just. heavy loads and waters high.'

      So you quit going in the canyon down and, at some point, head up a dry creek or draw to the left?

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      • #4
        Your botg right now and stuck ain’t ya?! Lol we’ve all been there before smh

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        • #5
          The water might be flowing too fast to go up the creek, so going down stream could be the answer! You have to adjust if you want to find it! I think heavy loads are a couple boulders on either side of the creek... markers that’ll be there a thousand years from now. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Imeverybodynow View Post
            Your botg right now and stuck ain’t ya?! Lol we’ve all been there before smh
            Well, I am trying to be objective because I do think my enthusiasm for my theory allows too much confirmation bias to slip in. I keep looking for things that will make my theory work and in the case of the last few clues, I have always thought you really had to be there to realize how the clues fit the reality of the BOTG experience.

            I also lose confidence when I think about how obvious it will be when the finder locates the chest and sees exactly how the clues fit. It gives little comfort to also feel that Forest is clever enough to find a place that has many if not hundreds of such locations in the actual hiding area. Each one of which could seem an obvious fit for the clues if the only the chest were there. The person who finds it will have earned it.
            Last edited by Wayne Ross; 07-20-2019, 10:14 PM.

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            • #7
              This part I think would be interesting when finder finds it and explains it. There are 3 things to this: solved clue(s), directional relationships making sense, and finally, how it looks on a map.
              Questing song: Iron Maiden's "Quest for Fire" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ppwIZ0EnXg

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              • #8
                There’s a way to pinpoint the exact spot. Forrest even told us, the clues in the poem will lead you precisely to the treasure. The finder will have moved with confidence.
                Before you spend money and go BOTG, if you want to save yourself some money and a letdown and deflation of morale, I suggest you have an exact precise spot.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Imeverybodynow View Post
                  There’s a way to pinpoint the exact spot. Forrest even told us, the clues in the poem will lead you precisely to the treasure. The finder will have moved with confidence.
                  Before you spend money and go BOTG, if you want to save yourself some money and a letdown and deflation of morale, I suggest you have an exact precise spot.
                  I've had an exact precise spot at least ten times.

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                  • #10
                    Down need not be in the direction that gravity flows. Fenn uses his words as tools to convey meaning. In the poem he does not use literal translation often. This also goes towards no paddle up your creek. Why does up have to be the opposite of down? Further, couldn't he be telling us not to go up the creek at all? No paddle = don't continue uo stream? Most, but not all, canyons have been carved by water, and some of them regardless of mode of formation are now completely dry. Could Fenn mean by there will be no paddle up your creek to say that you can't paddle because there is no water in the canyon? Perhaps at the end of a dry canyon formed long ago by glacial action there is a pond with mist rising off of it. Mist is water floating up high.

                    Fenn did not write linearly. I believe we should read his poem laterally it

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                    • #11
                      Take it in the canyon down to HOB does not necessarily mean HOB is at a lower elevation.... Following a canyon down which is generally created by a water feature will be of lower elevation....Sure.... But HOB does not necessarily reside at the same elevation as the river.... or whatever.... the elevation of HOB could be higher than WWWH, as long as it is in or near the canyon!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wayne Ross View Post
                        So, I have pondered this a lot and thought I would ask for your take on this. Here is the reason for asking the question.

                        Forrest tells us to ‘take it in the canyon down’. Now ‘down’ to me means that I go from one elevation at WWWH and take the canyon down, not far, but too far to walk, to a place, the HOB, that will be lower in elevation. Down meaning down to a lower location. If a creek is involved in the canyon this would be downstream.

                        From here, it is no place for the meek and there will be no paddle ‘up your creek’. When do you quit going down the canyon, which I assume also means down the creek as water flows downhill, and take a turn to be going ‘up your creek’? Does this mean a turn to travel up a dry creek, a draw or somewhere where you are not able to get in the creek to travel by water? Do you actually quit going downstream and start going upstream?

                        In traveling on waterways there is a difference between upstream and downstream. Is Forrest telling us to take a turn from traveling in the canyon down to go up a creek or draw where you will need no paddle?

                        What do you think?
                        I think this phrase is your search-ending mistake: the HOB, that will be lower in elevation.
                        It kills thousands of solutions in a single blow. Fenn's giant killer, solution killer, lead dog killer; an Escher painting of endless failure.

                        https://giphy.com/gifs/day-w9yIu38Qa6Vnq


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                        • #13
                          Ask Lewis and Clark ...

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                          • #14
                            Wayne - watch out for confirmation bias LOL - what if the first portion of your solve was correct (i.e. Osiers CO) and you are stuck framing it on the darn blaze, which you interpret to be a 4 1/2 feet by 6" NM354 arrow on the side of a 900 foot cliff. AND by the way, to see NM354 you have to scramble way off the track at the gorge and look sideways back at the tunnel (VERY dangerous and no place for the kids....). Its a 600 foot straight down drop with VERY loose rocks. We have been here looking in 2016 and 2018. Tom Terrific has been here 100's of times with his tours. THere are a few others. IMO the arch is mute and you are in the CORRECT AREA, but have a severe confirmation bias that keeps you stuck over at that darn tunnel.

                            The double omegas are the Rio de los Pinos Omega's, not the tunnels. The WWWH is Osiers or Cumbres Tours Rt17 location. Try to tie in the CDT (Continental Divide Trail). It passes right by both Cumbres Tours Rt17 WWWH and also below Osiers 1500 feet. https://caltopo.com/map.html#ll=36.9...=0.3&a=c%2Cmba

                            CHECK OUT CRUCES SOLVES - they take a whole lot of your ideas (minus the Arch NM354 confirmation bias) and leads you straight to where the chest may be, more realistically. AND the GEOLOGY also speaks volumes in CRUCES!!!
                            Last edited by creatchachacha; 07-21-2019, 11:30 AM.

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                            • #15
                              CRUCES BASIN WILDERNESS
                              CRUCES BASIN

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