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  • Eliot

    Following on from the https://www.wherewarmwaters-halt.com/ "Fly Me to the Moon" sequence, with the reference to T.S. Eliot via Carl Sagan (thanks to ksfromKS and Treasure Codex for the links), I paid Eliot's poetry a visit for the first time since I was at school. I have spent an hour or so with The Four Quartets, and am moved to say that this is what Fenn's chase has been all about for me.

    Although it would take months of study to truly get under the skin of the Quartets, there was immediate recognition of a mind moving with both effort and acceptance toward the still core that lies at the center. It's there, in the middle, that the answer lies. Add in the Sagan and you have science and poetry meeting in a philosophical embrace that is truly potent. Yes, this treasure hunt requires the cold, hard rigor of analysis, but without the opening of the mind to new concepts and experiences, there is little chance that the analysis will bear fruit. Sagan put it this way:
    Common sense works fine for the universe we’re used to, for time scales of decades, for a space between a tenth of a millimeter and a few thousand kilometers, and for speeds much less than the speed of light. Once we leave those domains of human experience, there’s no reason to expect the laws of nature to continue to obey our expectations, since our expectations are dependent on a limited set of experiences. The matter we’re made out of was cooked in the center of stars.
    My contention is, and has been for a long time, that we must journey into those unexplored domains to find the solution we seek. Then, not only do we have a chance of retrieving the chest, but also being able to "go in peace." In the latter part of "Little Gidding" Eliot quotes Dame Julian of Norwich:
    And all shall be well and
    All manner of thing shall be well.
    In my opinion, it's well worth reading a good modern translation of Julian's revelations for an understanding of how that Fenn line and Eliot's work could help us journey ever nearer that goal.

  • #2
    I enjoyed your thoughts.

    "Never underestimate the power of a quarter." FF

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    • #3
      Originally posted by voxpops View Post
      Following on from the https://www.wherewarmwaters-halt.com/ "Fly Me to the Moon" sequence, with the reference to T.S. Eliot via Carl Sagan (thanks to ksfromKS and Treasure Codex for the links), I paid Eliot's poetry a visit for the first time since I was at school. I have spent an hour or so with The Four Quartets, and am moved to say that this is what Fenn's chase has been all about for me.

      Although it would take months of study to truly get under the skin of the Quartets, there was immediate recognition of a mind moving with both effort and acceptance toward the still core that lies at the center. It's there, in the middle, that the answer lies. Add in the Sagan and you have science and poetry meeting in a philosophical embrace that is truly potent. Yes, this treasure hunt requires the cold, hard rigor of analysis, but without the opening of the mind to new concepts and experiences, there is little chance that the analysis will bear fruit. Sagan put it this way:


      My contention is, and has been for a long time, that we must journey into those unexplored domains to find the solution we seek. Then, not only do we have a chance of retrieving the chest, but also being able to "go in peace." In the latter part of "Little Gidding" Eliot quotes Dame Julian of Norwich:


      In my opinion, it's well worth reading a good modern translation of Julian's revelations for an understanding of how that Fenn line and Eliot's work could help us journey ever nearer that goal.
      It was a good read !
      Here is a little more about the poem Little Gidding.
      There is much more to see.
      TS Eliot's poem was inspired by Pentecost.

      http://www.columbia.edu/itc/history/...legidding.html

      " And glow more intense than blaze of branch, or brazier, "
      " Stirs the dumb spirit: no wind, but pentecostal fire "

      Pentecost was the speaking of the Ancient Hebrew Language !

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post
        I enjoyed your thoughts.

        "Never underestimate the power of a quarter." FF
        Or the power of the twist at the end.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

          Or the power of the twist at the end.
          Your point is not well made, but I got there in the end.

          So you are saying that you believe Forrest has put an electronic lock on the chest? And the hidey place thus prevents accidental discovery? That's a bit crazy. But - ok I'll bite -

          ​​​​​What if it's something masquerading as something quite commonplace? If so, what could it be?

          I'm not from the USA - is there anything like that, that might be commonly found in the wild? But easily looked straight past? Official-looking maybe?

          (Anyone gets any ideas the chest is hidden inside a locked high voltage power box and electrocutes themselves - it was not my fault!)
          ​​​

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