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  • Romancing the Stone

    A great movie. It’s on Direct TV this month and I’ve recorded it so my kids can watch it. This is where and when Michael Douglas entered my “top 10 actors I want to marry” list.

    Of course, it got me thinking about TTOTC. There has to be a map. There just has to be. Every great treasure hunt has a gnarly map. One with devils forks and skeletons and weird shaped rocks, etc etc. I believe the map is found along the way. We have to have that map to complete the mission.

    However, you’d think by now he would have said that there is a physical map one must fine. Or would he? Without the map, we are blind.

    My gut feeling is telling me that said map is found at HOB.

    Now back to my movie. Jack just ran off with the stone and she has the map.....eeeeeek.

  • #2
    The poem is a map, and the sentence before the poem (in the book) says as much:

    "So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:"

    "Precisely" is important, it is explaining to us (IMO) to view the poem as the map it is.

    The word precise, coming from praecisus, is to shorten, abridge; so basically I take that to mean that what we're looking at is concise, exact, and follows a distinct pattern because "precise" also means "conforming strictly to an exact pattern or standard : shaped, arranged, or performed with minute conformity to a pattern"...Fenn took great care in choosing the words he did, not only because they worked in the poem, but because they conformed to his pattern to create his map.

    By using the word "precisely" Fenn is telling us there is only one way to find the correct solution; he's left lots of kibbles and bits in TTOTC, more in his other books, and hands out hints like candy when he is asked questions, or publishes something. There is one common denominator in everything, but it isn't easy to see it - and when you do see it, it's hard to use it; and I'm not even sure I'm right with what I have, but what I have is really compelling as it answers a number of things and gives me the reason for why Fenn actually did the chase (hint: it's a means to an end).

    To Map: to plan (something) in detail
    To Map: to delineate (something) as if on a map
    Delineate: to describe in words especially with sharpness or vividness

    A Map: something (as a significant outward appearance, a pointed or concise verbal description) that indicates or delineates or reveals by representing or showing with a clarity suggestive of that of a map

    That said, he ended the above sentence with a colon; it too is important to note here: a colon, in punctuation, is used before an explanation, example, definition, restatement, recapitulation, quotation, appositive, or list and especially after or in place of such expressions as namely, as follows or sometimes between the clauses of a compound sentence especially when no conjunction is used and when the clauses balance each other antithetically.

    By using a colon after the lead-in sentence, Fenn is telling us that what follows is a brief summary of essential points, statements, or facts.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Copper View Post
      A great movie. It’s on Direct TV this month and I’ve recorded it so my kids can watch it. This is where and when Michael Douglas entered my “top 10 actors I want to marry” list.

      Of course, it got me thinking about TTOTC. There has to be a map. There just has to be. Every great treasure hunt has a gnarly map. One with devils forks and skeletons and weird shaped rocks, etc etc. I believe the map is found along the way. We have to have that map to complete the mission.

      However, you’d think by now he would have said that there is a physical map one must fine. Or would he? Without the map, we are blind.

      My gut feeling is telling me that said map is found at HOB.

      Now back to my movie. Jack just ran off with the stone and she has the map.....eeeeeek.
      Phenomenal movie! It reminds me of watching it with my parents and growing up.

      mm
      If you would like to know my W.W.W.H., get a list of over 600 G.N.I.S. potential ones, and another list of 5,000 searchable springs with coordinate information, you can literally buy it here for $25: https://www.ebay.com/itm/283499665615

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RahRah View Post
        The poem is a map, and the sentence before the poem (in the book) says as much:

        "So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:"

        "Precisely" is important, it is explaining to us (IMO) to view the poem as the map it is.

        The word precise, coming from praecisus, is to shorten, abridge; so basically I take that to mean that what we're looking at is concise, exact, and follows a distinct pattern because "precise" also means "conforming strictly to an exact pattern or standard : shaped, arranged, or performed with minute conformity to a pattern"...Fenn took great care in choosing the words he did, not only because they worked in the poem, but because they conformed to his pattern to create his map.

        By using the word "precisely" Fenn is telling us there is only one way to find the correct solution; he's left lots of kibbles and bits in TTOTC, more in his other books, and hands out hints like candy when he is asked questions, or publishes something. There is one common denominator in everything, but it isn't easy to see it - and when you do see it, it's hard to use it; and I'm not even sure I'm right with what I have, but what I have is really compelling as it answers a number of things and gives me the reason for why Fenn actually did the chase (hint: it's a means to an end).

        To Map: to plan (something) in detail
        To Map: to delineate (something) as if on a map
        Delineate: to describe in words especially with sharpness or vividness

        A Map: something (as a significant outward appearance, a pointed or concise verbal description) that indicates or delineates or reveals by representing or showing with a clarity suggestive of that of a map

        That said, he ended the above sentence with a colon; it too is important to note here: a colon, in punctuation, is used before an explanation, example, definition, restatement, recapitulation, quotation, appositive, or list and especially after or in place of such expressions as namely, as follows or sometimes between the clauses of a compound sentence especially when no conjunction is used and when the clauses balance each other antithetically.

        By using a colon after the lead-in sentence, Fenn is telling us that what follows is a brief summary of essential points, statements, or facts.
        Great response, thank you. I can’t help but think that we all need to stand up and shake the dust off a bit. Simplify. A treasure hunt for families, friendly to kids. Every treasure hunting movie has a map. The map is the first thing we must find. That’s why the first two clues hold people up. You must know WWWH. I don’t think the searchers who have identified WWWH are spending enough time at WWWH. Think about the surprise and thrill of finding an old treasure map! He keeps saying “bring a good map.” He does not say “bring the poem that is your map.”

        George Montgomery-looked straight ahead without seeing the crash. GM-good map.
        Ray Charles-Blind. A blind person can’t find the treasure. They can’t see.
        Then there are these damn Baby Ruth candy bars. The wrappers. Soda labels, candy bars, identifiers to what something is.

        Say there is a candy bar sitting on your table. It could be a Snickers, a Milky Way, a Whatchamacallit, whatever. You don’t know what exactly it is, but you do know the general idea of what it is. It’s a candy bar. The wrapper tells you what exactly it is.

        Donnie and Forrest burned their map. So they got lost. They knew where they were sorta, but paid the price by getting lost.

        But besides all of that and this latest silly theory I have. What does every single treasure hunt worth it’s salt have? What must you find first before you can move forward? A map. I do not think he gave us the map. I think he gave us the poem to guide us to the general area, but it must be married to a map.

        Imagine being the only searcher in possession of the actual map required to end the search. Talk about going with confidence. I’m starting to believe the poem is a vague as hell map to get us to “the map.” You must start from the beginning physically because you aren’t going to find that sucker without the map. IMO. Has he ever said there is no second map?

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        • #5
          Also-the repetition of five. Every good map has five main elements. Find the five. Find the map. Then mail the map to me please.

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          • #6
            And one more thing! Sorry. “All you need is the poem and a good map.”

            If the poem were the map wouldn’t that sentence be a little redundant?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Copper View Post
              Also-the repetition of five. Every good map has five main elements. Find the five. Find the map. Then mail the map to me please.

              And one more thing! Sorry. “All you need is the poem and a good map.”

              If the poem were the map wouldn’t that sentence be a little redundant?
              Perhaps a better way to say it is that the poem is a map that takes you to the good map that one traditionally thinks of as a 'map' - the poem is an unconventional map if you will, so you still need to find the 'map' you think of traditionally as a map, and the poem points you to it. Does that make sense? Fenn says to marry the places in the poem to a map, and I look at it that he has to tell us what map, and that is in the poem.

              Comment


              • #8
                In SB 202, Gadi nailed the wrappers to the sign at the trailhead. I’ve never hiked Red Canyon, but I’ve hiked many trails where the sign at the trailhead is a map. Gadi was labeling/marrying clues to the map. By the time Dal got there, the wrappers were on the ground and he threw them away. Dal was disregarding the labels on the map. And if he had sent them to F to picture in that SB, they may have brought other searchers luck. Did this scenario really happen? Um, I doubt it. It was just an example of how important labels on a map can be, and a lesson to searchers to not disregard anything. Is the map at a trailhead? Is this why people have walked right past it?

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                • #9
                  It’s worth going back to tarryscant.com to read everything he has said about maps. He certainly hints towards what Rah is saying. His map in his book is not detailed though, so I’m still not sure how simply putting an x in the right spot is doable.

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                  • #10
                    but paid the price by getting lost. Thats funny. Were all lost, we're all moving around blind, hahahah lololol!!! All these years and botg's, all wrong! Not just abc, but xyz.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RahRah View Post

                      Perhaps a better way to say it is that the poem is a map that takes you to the good map that one traditionally thinks of as a 'map' - the poem is an unconventional map if you will, so you still need to find the 'map' you think of traditionally as a map, and the poem points you to it. Does that make sense? Fenn says to marry the places in the poem to a map, and I look at it that he has to tell us what map, and that is in the poem.
                      or the map is a book.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OneMoreBOTG View Post
                        In SB 202, Gadi nailed the wrappers to the sign at the trailhead. I’ve never hiked Red Canyon, but I’ve hiked many trails where the sign at the trailhead is a map. Gadi was labeling/marrying clues to the map. By the time Dal got there, the wrappers were on the ground and he threw them away. Dal was disregarding the labels on the map. And if he had sent them to F to picture in that SB, they may have brought other searchers luck. Did this scenario really happen? Um, I doubt it. It was just an example of how important labels on a map can be, and a lesson to searchers to not disregard anything. Is the map at a trailhead? Is this why people have walked right past it?
                        to blaze a new trail, you do the abcs first and then unleash the pictures from your mind, at the unknown trailhead perhaps?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The map he wants you to use is Google Earth. He said excellent for a reason.
                          Excellent research materials are TTOTC, Google Earth, and/or a good map.f
                          Excellent = Very good;of the highest quality.

                          Just like the map in the movie, imagination is used as geological formations. The #1 people are the Indians who named geological formations and Forrest is all about the Indian culture.

                          Great thread Copper.
                          Last edited by OH!!; 07-09-2019, 06:56 AM.
                          "Rhythm means timing, rhythm means rhyme, the poems twenty four lines are all about thyme"
                          --- OH!!

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                          • #14
                            Recently watched The Goonies, Romancing the Stone, and Treasure Island with Jackie Cooper. All fun and interesting to watch, but a lot different than Fenn’s Treasure hunt/Chase. Still, you never know what will spark your next new idea.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OneMoreBOTG View Post
                              In SB 202, Gadi nailed the wrappers to the sign at the trailhead. I’ve never hiked Red Canyon, but I’ve hiked many trails where the sign at the trailhead is a map. Gadi was labeling/marrying clues to the map. By the time Dal got there, the wrappers were on the ground and he threw them away. Dal was disregarding the labels on the map. And if he had sent them to F to picture in that SB, they may have brought other searchers luck. Did this scenario really happen? Um, I doubt it. It was just an example of how important labels on a map can be, and a lesson to searchers to not disregard anything. Is the map at a trailhead? Is this why people have walked right past it?
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                              "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after." -Henry David Thoreau

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