Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Important Literature Books & The Search States Found w/in Them

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Important Literature Books & The Search States Found w/in Them

    Important Literature Books & The Search States Found w/in Them:

    1. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
    • Montana
    2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Montana made him a millionaire
    • New Mexico
    3. The Outlaw Trail: A Journey Through Time by Robert Redford
    • Montana
    • Wyoming
    • Colorado
    • New Mexico
    4. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    • Montana - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
    • Wyoming - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
    5. Kismet: An "Arabian Night" in Three Acts by Edward Knoblock
    • None - This is actually a play written into a book, though, so might not count as a "book".

    Conclusion:

    Other than the Kismet, which could technically be considered a play instead of a book, the only search state that is mentioned in all four books referenced in the Important Literature chapter of TTOTC is the state of Montana.

    "It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure... f"
    If you would like to know my W.W.W.H., get a list of over 600 G.N.I.S. potential ones, and another list of 5,000 searchable springs with coordinate information, you can literally buy it here for $25: https://www.ebay.com/itm/283499665615

  • #2
    Originally posted by minotaur_moreno View Post
    Important Literature Books & The Search States Found w/in Them:

    1. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
    • Montana
    2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Montana made him a millionaire
    • New Mexico
    3. The Outlaw Trail: A Journey Through Time by Robert Redford
    • Montana
    • Wyoming
    • Colorado
    • New Mexico
    4. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    • Montana - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
    • Wyoming - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
    5. Kismet: An "Arabian Night" in Three Acts by Edward Knoblock
    • None - This is actually a play written into a book, though, so might not count as a "book".

    Conclusion:

    Other than the Kismet, which could technically be considered a play instead of a book, the only search state that is mentioned in all four books referenced in the Important Literature chapter of TTOTC is the state of Montana.

    "It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure... f"
    "It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure... f"

    That would be one important clue that requires deep thinking. Which one might that be ?

    Comment


    • #3
      "That would be one important clue that requires deep thinking. Which one might that be ?"

      The third one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by minotaur_moreno View Post
        Important Literature Books & The Search States Found w/in Them:

        1. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
        • Montana
        2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
        • Montana made him a millionaire
        • New Mexico
        3. The Outlaw Trail: A Journey Through Time by Robert Redford
        • Montana
        • Wyoming
        • Colorado
        • New Mexico
        4. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
        • Montana - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
        • Wyoming - (by way of the Yellowstone National Park reference)
        5. Kismet: An "Arabian Night" in Three Acts by Edward Knoblock
        • None - This is actually a play written into a book, though, so might not count as a "book".

        Conclusion:

        Other than the Kismet, which could technically be considered a play instead of a book, the only search state that is mentioned in all four books referenced in the Important Literature chapter of TTOTC is the state of Montana.

        "It seems logical to me that a deep thinking treasure searcher could use logic to determine an important clue to the location of the treasure... f"
        There is also a reference to Madison in Catcher & TR

        Comment


        • #5
          It'll probably be in Colorado. Just because it seems like the majority of bloggers like the other 3 states better. New Mexico is still on my favorites. But that's the easiest state to have. You only have to search a 1/4 of it. Could get that done in a week. Childs play
          . Lol.

          Comment


          • #6
            So I'm back on my look at the big picture.
            wwwh - Montana
            canyon down - brings you to Wyoming
            to far to walk - Wyoming
            Hob - Colorado
            the rest of the clues New Mexico.
            well that was easy.
            I don't think it comes into play. But did you know the NPS runs the Natural Register of Historical Places. 16million dollar budget. I feel like I'm going in circles. FF made my starting point 8.2 miles from Sante Fe. Which makes the halfway point to the candian border. The Great Divide. Which is in the middle of the poem. Hmmm. it's almost like I have to make a horseshoe or omega symbol loop back to the blaze. What a rascal. I could show you the blaze.. which I'm 85% sure is wrong. But the land owners near by. Would be super pissed with the swarm.

            Comment


            • #7
              Kismet is the odd man out in "Important Literature." It's not a book, it's a 3-act play by Edward Knoblauch (later Knoblock) from 1911. In 1953 it was made into a very popular musical by Robert Wright and George *Forrest*. In the voice of the Church Lady "How conveeenient!" (I'm joking: coincidences like this abound in the Chase) Still, I'd like to decipher the Kismet connection (aside from its translation of Fate or Destiny in Turkish). All the other books/authors mentioned have direct connections to my solution, but Kismet eludes me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                Kismet is the odd man out in "Important Literature." It's not a book, it's a 3-act play by Edward Knoblauch (later Knoblock) from 1911. In 1953 it was made into a very popular musical by Robert Wright and George *Forrest*. In the voice of the Church Lady "How conveeenient!" (I'm joking: coincidences like this abound in the Chase) Still, I'd like to decipher the Kismet connection (aside from its translation of Fate or Destiny in Turkish). All the other books/authors mentioned have direct connections to my solution, but Kismet eludes me.
                Destiny - fate, it's in the stars..... ??

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post
                  Kismet is the odd man out in "Important Literature." It's not a book, it's a 3-act play by Edward Knoblauch (later Knoblock) from 1911. In 1953 it was made into a very popular musical by Robert Wright and George *Forrest*. In the voice of the Church Lady "How conveeenient!" (I'm joking: coincidences like this abound in the Chase) Still, I'd like to decipher the Kismet connection (aside from its translation of Fate or Destiny in Turkish). All the other books/authors mentioned have direct connections to my solution, but Kismet eludes me.
                  PORTION....DIVIDE....the word kismet is from root of qasama "he divided."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What about Oliver Twist?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kismet could either be a nugget or just another rabbit hole...

                      Let's see, there's Kismet, NY, a hamlet on Fire Island, NY - for those that like the "Island" theme don't forget to include Manhattan and Gardiner's Island. Seems these locations cover the east, west, and south sides of Long Island, NY.

                      Then there's Kismet the MARVEL Comic character. According to Wikipedia, she was known for her golden skin and her super power is her ability to use cosmic energy to prevent her from aging...making her virtually immortal. She was also know as: Paragon, Ayesha, Starduster, and She Whose Trail Dusts Hope. In Earth-X, she and Warlock had a child named Mar-Vell...who becomes Captain Marvel....
                      Last edited by CrabbyMD; 07-12-2019, 08:16 AM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X