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The Poem's Evil Twin

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  • The Poem's Evil Twin


    August 08, 2016 (edited from cc)

    There is a clue in the poem that nobody knows about. Well, most searchers kinda know about it but they don’t use it properly. It’s Clue #10. It’s the Planet X of clues, out there beyond Neptune and Pluto, beyond the nine known clues. It’s almost invisible without the aid of good telescopes and psychic magnifiers. Think of Clue #10 as an aberration at the edge: it’s a peripheral floating image that your eye leaps to, and it disappears when you look at it directly. Forrest likes his edges.

    Even though we call this rascal Clue #10, 10 is not necessarily its position in the sequence of clues. The burden is on you to place it in the proper sequence, and of course, you have to interpret its meaning correctly. But once the meaning and position are known you’ll be light years ahead of everyone else:

    No one talks about this evil twin or realizes its importance. It doesn’t do anything overtly bad---it just screws up your solution when it’s not included. Forrest obviously knows about it and he uses it like a ninja warrior, but he doesn’t explicitly describe this clue inside the poem. We can’t ‘see’ where it’s used because it’s not written into any of the stanzas. We have to think about it for a good long while. It’s what Forrest intended us to do. The poem is hard to unravel and this invisible clue makes it even harder. By the way, you say you solved the poem in five hours? You’re not done yet, O Perfect Genius.

    Clue #10 has a good twin who (some of us) know quite well, and (some of us) can place correctly in the sequence. But we’re not consciously aware of the evil twin’s position in the list. This is a bad thing because the evil twin is key to cracking the poem and gaining confidence in searches. And like all good/bad twin combos, they look alike but they act differently. Just ask Stewie Griffin.

    Clue #10 may be good news or bad, depending on your ability to think outside the strait jacket that is currently defined by the search community. This jacket says follow the 9 clues consecutively. And there’s nothing wrong with doing that. Forrest himself has said the clues are contiguous and consecutive, and Clue #10 fits in the box just fine.

    But Forrest did not write a poem that is easy to understand, so it’s perfectly logical and necessary at this time---after six fruitless years---to wonder whether there might be terms or directions floating in the cosmic aura of the poem that are not visibly mentioned, directions we must extract in order for our exploration on the ground to make sense. I’m not speaking of anagrams or codes here but I am speaking of a leap of imagination that you must perform if you are to break on through to the other side. You must find the 10th clue.

    What better way to make this poem nearly impenetrable than to leave out one of the most important clues needed, and on top of that, force us to discover its use? This is the pure evil that is Forrest Fenn’s poet mind at work. Perhaps Devil Fenn should have told us to follow all the clues consecutively, including the invisible ones. A favor, please? If you see this devil today tase him once for me.

    “Use it once, be a dunce. Use it twice, gold is nice.”


  • #2
    hey! I have an idea, keyword....remove your posts right now. They have nothing to do with my OP.
    Do it. NOW.

    Comment


    • #3
      how's that.. better?

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll give y'all a giant hint for free: X = the home of Brown. You don't know the home of Brown until you've solved the entire poem. X equals 10 in Roman Numerals. The letters ENDING CLUE anagram to INDULGENCE (the name of the chest). X is also the only letter not present in the poem. Where should the mystery clue go in the sequence? Look for stuff on the edges since what is unspoken can be just as important. The temperatures 'warm' and 'cold' are both in the poem, but not 'hot.' Where should 'hot' be placed? Starting putting together the pieces folks. I can't compile the research all on my own.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by thehomeofBrown.com View Post
          I'll give y'all a giant hint for free: X = the home of Brown. You don't know the home of Brown until you've solved the entire poem. X equals 10 in Roman Numerals. The letters ENDING CLUE anagram to INDULGENCE (the name of the chest). X is also the only letter not present in the poem. Where should the mystery clue go in the sequence? Look for stuff on the edges since what is unspoken can be just as important. The temperatures 'warm' and 'cold' are both in the poem, but not 'hot.' Where should 'hot' be placed? Starting putting together the pieces folks. I can't compile the research all on my own.
          "Hot" is absolutely in the poem...it's just not overtly spelled out for you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RahRah View Post

            "Hot" is absolutely in the poem...it's just not overtly spelled out for you.
            I know. I'm just telling people what and where to look. I'll even say where one is: look in the line above 'warm'. A synonym of 'new' is 'hot.'

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 1keyword View Post
              how's that.. better?
              thank you.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by larsonist View Post
                Forrest himself has said the clues are contiguous and consecutive, and Clue #10 fits in the box just fine.
                “Use it once, be a dunce. Use it twice, gold is nice.”
                Go find an example of the clue sequence out on the web. They may differ slightly but that's not super important. Pick whatever makes sense to you.
                Most of them start with wwwh and end with blaze, nine clues in a row.

                Now add one of those nine clues to the sequence to make a ten-clue list: 10 clues with a pair of twins.
                Insert this clue in various places in your list and see if the sequence still makes sense.
                Or maybe it makes more sense than it did with just nine clues.
                It probably won't jump out at you right away so keep experimenting. Have faith that Clue #10 really exists. You're bound to find the key word sooner or later.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by larsonist View Post
                  August 08, 2016 (edited from cc)

                  There is a clue in the poem that nobody knows about. Well, most searchers kinda know about it but they don’t use it properly. It’s Clue #10. It’s the Planet X of clues, out there beyond Neptune and Pluto, beyond the nine known clues. It’s almost invisible without the aid of good telescopes and psychic magnifiers. Think of Clue #10 as an aberration at the edge: it’s a peripheral floating image that your eye leaps to, and it disappears when you look at it directly. Forrest likes his edges.

                  Even though we call this rascal Clue #10, 10 is not necessarily its position in the sequence of clues. The burden is on you to place it in the proper sequence, and of course, you have to interpret its meaning correctly. But once the meaning and position are known you’ll be light years ahead of everyone else:

                  No one talks about this evil twin or realizes its importance. It doesn’t do anything overtly bad---it just screws up your solution when it’s not included. Forrest obviously knows about it and he uses it like a ninja warrior, but he doesn’t explicitly describe this clue inside the poem. We can’t ‘see’ where it’s used because it’s not written into any of the stanzas. We have to think about it for a good long while. It’s what Forrest intended us to do. The poem is hard to unravel and this invisible clue makes it even harder. By the way, you say you solved the poem in five hours? You’re not done yet, O Perfect Genius.

                  Clue #10 has a good twin who (some of us) know quite well, and (some of us) can place correctly in the sequence. But we’re not consciously aware of the evil twin’s position in the list. This is a bad thing because the evil twin is key to cracking the poem and gaining confidence in searches. And like all good/bad twin combos, they look alike but they act differently. Just ask Stewie Griffin.

                  Clue #10 may be good news or bad, depending on your ability to think outside the strait jacket that is currently defined by the search community. This jacket says follow the 9 clues consecutively. And there’s nothing wrong with doing that. Forrest himself has said the clues are contiguous and consecutive, and Clue #10 fits in the box just fine.

                  But Forrest did not write a poem that is easy to understand, so it’s perfectly logical and necessary at this time---after six fruitless years---to wonder whether there might be terms or directions floating in the cosmic aura of the poem that are not visibly mentioned, directions we must extract in order for our exploration on the ground to make sense. I’m not speaking of anagrams or codes here but I am speaking of a leap of imagination that you must perform if you are to break on through to the other side. You must find the 10th clue.

                  What better way to make this poem nearly impenetrable than to leave out one of the most important clues needed, and on top of that, force us to discover its use? This is the pure evil that is Forrest Fenn’s poet mind at work. Perhaps Devil Fenn should have told us to follow all the clues consecutively, including the invisible ones. A favor, please? If you see this devil today tase him once for me.

                  “Use it once, be a dunce. Use it twice, gold is nice.”
                  "I like THAT!"
                  "If you think it could not have been put there, your probably right. f " https://youtu.be/St6jyEFe5WM

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    More Clues Revealed!
                    Clue #10

                    The treasure is hidden higher than 5,000 feet above sea level.
                    Clue #11

                    No need to dig up the old outhouses, the treasure is not associated with any structure.
                    Clue #12

                    The treasure is not in a graveyard
                    Clue #13

                    The treasure is not hidden in Idaho or Utah
                    Last edited by Treasure Joe; 07-05-2019, 06:22 PM.
                    "It is fun to arrange words in such a way that you have to smile at the end of a sentence." - Forrest Fenn

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      larsonist

                      I appreciate your creativity and imagination. It seems you originally suggested this several years ago, which would seem like an advantage (some might say), to have found such a devil.

                      Curiosity piqued, may I ask if you understand both significance and place value within, is there a disconnect between that knowledge and a map?

                      I am new to the forum, so I don't know your personality well and haven't followed your prior posts, so I understand if you respectfully decline to answer.
                      Last edited by ksfromKS; 07-06-2019, 09:04 PM. Reason: Feel free to private message me if you prefer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ksfromKS View Post
                        larsonist

                        I appreciate your creativity and imagination. It seems you originally suggested this several years ago, which would seem like an advantage (some might say), to have found such a devil.

                        Curiosity piqued, may I ask if you understand both significance and place value within, is there a disconnect between that knowledge and a map?

                        I am new to the forum, so I don't know your personality well and haven't followed your prior posts, so I understand if you respectfully decline to answer.
                        https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/chase/solves-f9/

                        Read 'Searching at 11,000,000 feet' at the link above. It has a similar theme to 'evil twin' but is more recent. It may answer your question. If not please ask again.

                        Comment

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