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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jackrabbit View Post
    Nah, it's about the find, not the chase, for me anyways. Finding the chest would give the resources needed for other chases, and I have quite a list of plausible treasures that I'd like to go looking for.
    There are billion dollar treasures still out there. And I worked on a 14 billion one. Not an average treasure hunt but huge potential for a certain group.
    https://www.iacr.org/misc/china/
    But at this point either Supreme Court intervention. Which they denied to hear. Or there is another avenue that has not been explored as I see it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

      There are billion dollar treasures still out there. And I worked on a 14 billion one. Not an average treasure hunt but huge potential for a certain group.
      https://www.iacr.org/misc/china/
      But at this point either Supreme Court intervention. Which they denied to hear. Or there is another avenue that has not been explored as I see it.
      Awesome! Thanks for sharing! I'll have to tinker with this later but I'm busy with a little Beale Cipher side project. Any ideas about why historically such a huge sum would be deposited? Maybe in relation to Japanese aggression in the area?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Jackrabbit View Post

        Awesome! Thanks for sharing! I'll have to tinker with this later but I'm busy with a little Beale Cipher side project. Any ideas about why historically such a huge sum would be deposited? Maybe in relation to Japanese aggression in the area?
        Yes 03/03/1933 was the date of agreement. Hoards of gold shipped to United States before invasion of China by Japan. $300,000,000.00 value at $20.67 per ounce.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_6102
        This executive order guarantees the safety of the deposit as only certain entities could store gold in Federal Reserve vaults and the Federal Reserve was also prohibited of being able to claim ownership of gold in their vaults. I don't know how Mr. Tao got the gold bars into his possession other than from relative. The translation on bars is of gold being stored in a special vault.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Jackrabbit View Post

          Awesome! Thanks for sharing! I'll have to tinker with this later but I'm busy with a little Beale Cipher side project. Any ideas about why historically such a huge sum would be deposited? Maybe in relation to Japanese aggression in the area?
          Beale cipher is a hoax. Skilled crypto people have proved it

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          • #20
            Click image for larger version  Name:	LKSL.JPG Views:	0 Size:	113.4 KB ID:	104979

            It's definitely Kyle Sandau. He is the "searcher" who claims it's buried in San Lazaro SOUTH of Santa Fe and his premise is based on Ric Hajovski's book "The Lost Kivas of San Lazaro". He spent months scooping up every available copy to deny them to other searchers. He used to show multiple copies in his videos and brag about how he had ALL of them. They would be loaned/checked out from Libraries and never returned. I know because I attempted to buy a copy a couple of times and could never find one.

            His old videos were all about conspiracy and Dal being a big part of it. About Forrest lying about where the treasure is. He concluded the book was no longer available because it had additional information not included in Forrest's book "The Secrets of San Lazaro Pueblo" and included the newly discovered Kiva where Kyle believes it is buried.

            Well, Ric Hajovsky decided to sell his book again via Amazon "print on demand" a week ago which obviously didn't make Kyle happy. I was not at all surprised to see him release that video.

            Ric Hajovsky announced it on a couple of forums and has responded to a few searcher questions about timing and reasoning.
            Last edited by Diggio; 06-17-2019, 05:31 PM.
            "Misquotations are the only quotations that are never misquoted." - Hesketh Pearson

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            • #21
              Sounds like not every searcher is a cooperative team player.
              I am a firm believer that Forrest did not lie about where the treasure is located.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                Beale cipher is a hoax. Skilled crypto people have proved it
                I wouldn't be surprised if you're correct. I'd like to find the particular non-standard version of the Declaration of Independence used as the key to #2 though.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                  Beale cipher is a hoax. Skilled crypto people have proved it
                  Socalled skilled crypto people are limited in their abilities. I have had many ex-military intelligence cryptographers look at my work. Actually I find them lacking. I have a copy of their report they were ashamed to even sign.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                    Socalled skilled crypto people are limited in their abilities. I have had many ex-military intelligence cryptographers look at my work. Actually I find them lacking. I have a copy of their report they were ashamed to even sign.
                    *I* am a skilled crypto guy, and I can prove it's a hoax, not that this is the proper forum for going off on that tangent.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                      *I* am a skilled crypto guy, and I can prove it's a hoax, not that this is the proper forum for going off on that tangent.
                      What can a skilled crypto guy prove is a hoax ?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                        What can a skilled crypto guy prove is a hoax ?
                        Beale Cipher #1.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                          Beale Cipher #1.
                          I have my doubts about that. I believe I may be able to solve #3. I did a solve of KRYPTOS 4 which I believe to be accurate. But I won't pay Sanborn $50 to confirm. Heck, if he is making enough money selling solve reviews he may never acknowledge a solve. But please, why do you think you can prove hoax. In a general sense.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by TreasureCodex View Post

                            I have my doubts about that. I believe I may be able to solve #3. I did a solve of KRYPTOS 4 which I believe to be accurate. But I won't pay Sanborn $50 to confirm. Heck, if he is making enough money selling solve reviews he may never acknowledge a solve. But please, why do you think you can prove hoax. In a general sense.
                            No offense, but I seriously doubt you have solved the final 97 letters of Kryptos (K4). If you had, it would be self-apparent, and you wouldn't need to spend the $50. You could copyright it, announce it on one of the many public forums (Elonka's, for instance), and cryptanalysts could quickly confirm or disprove your solution. Before opening yourself and your solution to that level of scrutiny, I'd recommend reading these:

                            https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...uscript/?amp=1
                            http://www.zodiackillerciphers.com/?p=602

                            Beale, Voynich, Zodiac-340, Kryptos, Dorabella, D'Agapeyeff and Fenn's treasure puzzle share a similar allure, and the accompanying propensity for would-be solvers to delude themselves.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Zapster View Post

                              No offense, but I seriously doubt you have solved the final 97 letters of Kryptos (K4). If you had, it would be self-apparent, and you wouldn't need to spend the $50. You could copyright it, announce it on one of the many public forums (Elonka's, for instance), and cryptanalysts could quickly confirm or disprove your solution. Before opening yourself and your solution to that level of scrutiny, I'd recommend reading these:

                              https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...uscript/?amp=1
                              http://www.zodiackillerciphers.com/?p=602

                              Beale, Voynich, Zodiac-340, Kryptos, Dorabella, D'Agapeyeff and Fenn's treasure puzzle share a similar allure, and the accompanying propensity for would-be solvers to delude themselves.
                              It is self apparent that I solved Kryptos 4. Also solved Zodiac 340, Zodiac my name is letter and the socalled uncipherable part of Zodiacs first cipher and much more from Zodiac. The reason socalled cryptanalyst's cannot solve any of these as their methods are like bean counters. Sure they can solve many prescribed methods of ciphers. But they do not do well with something that requires interpretation. Like I said before. I have a multiple page report on my Zodiac 340 letter solve that was issued by group of ex-military intelligence cryptanalysts and I could show that they just don't understand. Elonka does not understand either when it comes to K4. I really don't need for confirmation from cryptanalysts that have failed for decades on solving anything that I have solved. That would be like asking chase forum if my Where The Treasure Lies solution is correct.

                              Do you think these guys would like to be shown up by an average Mason ?

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagger_Complex

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centra...ligence_Agency

                              You did not answer how you theorize that Beale Cipher #1 is a hoax.
                              Last edited by TreasureCodex; 06-18-2019, 01:39 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Click image for larger version

Name:	Beale1_frequencies.jpg
Views:	254
Size:	28.0 KB
ID:	105204 Beale short answer: long monotonic alphabetic strings generated using DoI, proving the DoI was used to encrypt part 1. Couple that with a dearth of E's, N's and R's and an artificially flat frequency distribution from B through I, and too many T's:
                                Attached Files

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