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  • Slowdown, wisdom comes through walking, talking and listening.

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    • Originally posted by RahRah View Post
      The poem is a map: read the poem, read the book, go back to the poem and read it again. Obviously not a direct quote, but basically what Fenn has said again and again.

      Why?

      For most, until very recently, understanding and using a map to find your way was like a second language. Recent advances in technology, where we have satellite access to images, the ground and roads, etc., means that the "ground knowledge" once taken for granted is now regarded as less precise, less useful, and more costly; so step-by-step, slowly, we begin to rely more on the technological and turn away from the traditional use of maps. While we gather ever more technological precision, at each extension of scale, detailed place-based knowledge gained over generations is lost, and wisdom mislaid.

      Fenn's poem attempts to get us to focus on locality, the smallest arena in which life is played out. This is the local, the actual place, where the reference is reality, indifference is unusual, detachment is difficult. For Fenn, this is a place where values and facts act upon each other and are passed on to us to create wisdom about nature, about living, dying and remembering. It implies people and place together, to keep us grounded.
      In my life experiences I could not believe the high percentage of people that could not read a map or understand basic directions to go from point a to b. I worked at a gas station and they came in in large numbers. People I came across outside of work , many were just as clueless. It seemed to me they lacked that "imagination" to see in their minds eye based on written or verbal language. Like a big blank screen to them.

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      • Yes imagination needed
        Attached Files

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        • The Great Gatsby:

          Fitzgerald’s work captures the evaporating memory of the American Eden while connecting it to the advent of the New World of smartness and thuggery and corruption. It was his rite of passage; it is our bridge to the time before “dreams” were slogans. He wanted to call it Among the Ashheaps and Millionaires — thank heaven that his editor, Maxwell Perkins, talked him out of it. It was nearly entitled just plain Gatsby. It remains “the great” because it confronts the defeat of youth and beauty and idealism, and finds the defeat unbearable, and then turns to face the defeat unflinchingly. With The Great Gatsby, American letters grew up.
          -Christopher Hitchens
          https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/p...s-great-gatsby

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          • One of the most perceptive essays F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, was “Early Success.” Three years after it was published, he was dead at 44.

            Snippet:
            The compensation of a very early success is a conviction that life is a romantic matter. In the best sense one stays young. When the primary objects of love and money could be taken for granted and a shaky eminence had lost its fascination, I had fairy years to waste, years that I can’t honestly regret, in seeking the eternal Carnival by the Sea. Once in the middle twenties I was driving along the High Corniche Road through the twilight with the whole French Riviera twinkling on the sea below. As far ahead as I could see was Monte Carlo, and though it was out of season and there were no Grand Dukes left to gamble and E. Phillips Oppenheim was a fat industrious man in my hotel, who lived in a bathrobe — the very name was so incorrigibly enchanting that I could only stop the car and like the Chinese whisper: “Ah me! Ah me!” It was not Monte Carlo I was looking at. It was back into the mind of the young man with cardboard soles who had walked the streets of New York. I was him again — for an instant I had the good fortune to share his dreams, I who had no more dreams of my own. And there are still times when I creep up on him, surprise him on an autumn morning in New York or a spring night in Carolina when it is so quiet that you can hear a dog barking in the next county. But never again during that all too short period when he and I were one person, when the fulfilled future and the wistful past were mingled in a single gorgeous moment — when life was literally a dream.

            https://www.jstor.org/stable/2636585...n_tab_contents

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            • Thunderrose thinks Fenn is KEWL.

              By the 1920s, the word “cool” had changed from being associated solely with temperature to a term of appreciation.

              In 1924, Anna Lee Chisholm recorded Cool Kind Daddy Blues, and Zora Neale Hurston, in her short story The Gilded Six-Bits, wrote of a male character: “And whut make it so cool, he got money ‘cumulated. And womens give it all to ‘im.”

              When he came to write The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald knew that the alluring masculinity of Gatsby was summed up by “cool”:

              “Who wants to go to town?” demanded Daisy insistently.
              Gatsby’s eyes floated toward her.
              “Ah,” she cried, “you look so cool.”
              Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other, alone in space. With an effort she glanced down at the table.
              “You always look so cool,” she repeated.
              She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. His mouth opened a little and he looked at Gatsby and then back at Daisy as if he had just recognized her as someone he knew a long time ago.”

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              • Originally posted by RahRah View Post
                One of the most perceptive essays F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, was “Early Success.” Three years after it was published, he was dead at 44.

                Snippet:
                The compensation of a very early success is a conviction that life is a romantic matter. In the best sense one stays young. When the primary objects of love and money could be taken for granted and a shaky eminence had lost its fascination, I had fairy years to waste, years that I can’t honestly regret, in seeking the eternal Carnival by the Sea. Once in the middle twenties I was driving along the High Corniche Road through the twilight with the whole French Riviera twinkling on the sea below. As far ahead as I could see was Monte Carlo, and though it was out of season and there were no Grand Dukes left to gamble and E. Phillips Oppenheim was a fat industrious man in my hotel, who lived in a bathrobe — the very name was so incorrigibly enchanting that I could only stop the car and like the Chinese whisper: “Ah me! Ah me!” It was not Monte Carlo I was looking at. It was back into the mind of the young man with cardboard soles who had walked the streets of New York. I was him again — for an instant I had the good fortune to share his dreams, I who had no more dreams of my own. And there are still times when I creep up on him, surprise him on an autumn morning in New York or a spring night in Carolina when it is so quiet that you can hear a dog barking in the next county. But never again during that all too short period when he and I were one person, when the fulfilled future and the wistful past were mingled in a single gorgeous moment — when life was literally a dream.

                https://www.jstor.org/stable/2636585...n_tab_contents
                Great quote RahRah. It seems he is speaking of living vicariously through his younger self. What he coveted was time and his youth, the freedom he had of being unburdened and just following his dreams.

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                • Cardboard soles, The VC detainee wearing shoes made outta used tires. Put's things into perspective, right?

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                  • Originally posted by lowkey View Post
                    Cardboard soles, The VC detainee wearing shoes made outta used tires. Put's things into perspective, right?
                    Among other things, yes, that is partly why I found the quote interesting and am paying more attention to the Important Literature chapter, piecing things together.

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                    • Originally posted by RahRah View Post

                      Among other things, yes, that is partly why I found the quote interesting and am paying more attention to the Important Literature chapter, piecing things together.
                      Ok, cool. You find anything you might find relevant in Catcher In The Rye? I found Holden's slow descent into madness fascinating but that's about the only thing I could apply to the chase. lol

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                      • I feel my sanity slipping away as I check the blogs 4 times a day

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                        • Originally posted by lowkey View Post
                          I feel my sanity slipping away as I check the blogs 4 times a day
                          How pleasant is the experience for you?

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                          • Originally posted by lowkey View Post
                            You find anything you might find relevant in Catcher In The Rye?
                            Damn rain.....you see.
                            In my opinion.

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                            • TR is fabulous lit. I've read it 50 times. It's 100% f. He's kewl because there's no x, something's never been found perhaps in ttotc history, more likely a reference to find the map, but then only finder could find it, sad.

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                              • Originally posted by Old Pilot View Post

                                How pleasant is the experience for you?
                                Well, my adventures out in the Chase BOTG are a solid 11 outta 10. My adventures in the blogs are a cool way to kill time in between BOTG. But Pilot, the mountains are always calling

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