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  • #91
    Tea for Two

    Picture you upon my knee,
    Just tea for two and two for tea,
    Just me for you
    And you for me alone.
    Nobody near us
    To see us or hear us,
    No friends or relations
    On weekend vacations.
    We won't have it known, dear,
    That we own a telephone, dear;
    Day will break and you'll awake
    And start to bake a sugar cake,
    For me to take
    For all the boys to see.
    We will raise a family,
    A boy for you, a girl for me.
    Oh, can't you see
    How happy we would be?

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    • #92

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      • #93
        The Thrill of the Chase:
        "My books have to write themselves or I struggle. This one did." - preface

        A book that writes itself.

        Sounds like he's saying the book was already written somewhere, and when he discovered its existence, it just unfolded in front of him.

        Or "automatic writing" (aka psychography) - a claimed psychic ability allowing a person to produce written words without consciously writing. The words purportedly arise from a subconscious, spiritual or supernatural source.

        Perhaps he's writing about free-writing, a technique in which a person writes continuously for a set period of time without regard to spelling, grammar, or topic?

        I just find that line curious.

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        • #94
          Imagination is more important than knowledge.

          So, while knowledge is useful, and likely needed to complete a solve, imagination takes precedence.

          THINK

          Thinking versus knowing.

          Think(ing) is more important than know(ing).

          I've said many times I believe there is something we are to find, in addition to the chest; something that will expose a truth. We do not need to "know" what this is, but we need to think about how to connect the dots to get to where Fenn wants us to go, and that is done by thinking - using our imagination - reflecting upon what he's provided, becoming aware of what he's saying without saying overtly, envisioning what he is saying, painting our own picture, in our mind, of what he is giving us to work with....words.

          Not many want to discuss, in any real detail, where warm waters halt. That's unfortunate.

          Fenn provides lots of examples for the clues (IMO).

          One example - where warm waters halt, waterfall - he's said "warm" means "comfortable" to him, so if you're out on the water and it's comfortable/warm, it's easy going, calm....where does that halt/stop or change? Perhaps at a waterfall, where the calmer running water now courses over the edge into a raging force of water?

          If you close your eyes, you can see it clearly - you're going along, then suddenly it's dangerous, raging water, pouring over the edge.....what do you call that? A waterfall, sheer drop, bluff, crag, cliff, cascade, etc. - take your pick, you have something to start with.

          Another example - where warm waters halt, river bathing - where the hot and cold water meet in the middle, Fenn describes avoiding the hot water and staying in the middle, where it is warm, where it is comfortable to just be and relax. Again, if you close your eyes, you can imagine being in that water, where it is warm, where it is comfortable, and why you'd try to stay there and avoid the scalding hot water on one side and the frigid cold water on the other side.....what do you call that? You're in the center, at the happy medium, at the midpoint, middle course, between two extremes, it's half and half - half hot, half cold, you're floating and free in the warm water.

          Those are just two examples, there are many more to consider too (IMO).

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          • #95
            A map is the greatest of all epic poems. It’s lines and colors show the realization of great dreams.
            -Gilbert H. Grosvenor

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            • #96
              The Map - Elizabeth Bishop (1934)

              Land lies in water; it is shadowed green.
              Shadows, or are they shallows, at its edges
              showing the line of long sea-weeded ledges
              where weeds hang to the simple blue from green.
              Or does the land lean down to lift the sea from under,
              drawing it unperturbed around itself?
              Along the fine tan sandy shelf
              is the land tugging at the sea from under?
              .
              The shadow of Newfoundland lies flat and still.
              Labrador’s yellow, where the moony Eskimo
              has oiled it. We can stroke these lovely bays,
              under a glass as if they were expected to blossom,
              or as if to provide a clean cage for invisible fish.
              The names of seashore towns run out to sea,
              the names of cities cross the neighboring mountains
              -the printer here experiencing the same excitement
              as when emotion too far exceeds its cause.
              These peninsulas take the water between thumb and finger
              like women feeling for the smoothness of yard-goods.
              .
              Mapped waters are more quiet than the land is,
              lending the land their waves’ own conformation:
              and Norway’s hare runs south in agitation,
              profiles investigate the sea, where land is.
              Are they assigned, or can the countries pick their colors?
              -What suits the character or the native waters best.
              Topography displays no favorites; North’s as near as West.
              More delicate than the historians’ are the map-makers’ colors.

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              • #97
                FIVE THEMES OF GEOGRAPHY:

                Human-Environmental Interactions
                How people interact and adapt to their environment.

                Movement
                People, goods, and ideas moving continually. People meet their needs by traveling to other places and/or trading with people in other places.

                Regions
                A region is an area define by common characteristics.
                Vernacular region- a region that is loosely defined by peoples perspectives; example Illinois is the Midwest and Texas is the South or Southwest.
                Formal region- a region defined by governmental or administrative boundaries; example, the United States.
                Functional region- a region defined by a function; example, transportation hubs.

                Location
                A places position on Earth. Every place on earth has a place on earth.
                Absolute location- An exact spot where something is found, latitude and longitude.
                Relative Location-the location of something based on its proximity to other human and/or physical features; described by landmarks, time, direction or distance from one place to another.

                Places
                The physical and human characteristics about a spot. Places have certain characteristics that describe it from every other place in the world.
                Physical Characteristics - weather, land, plants & animals, bodies of water
                People/human characteristics - cultures, ideas

                Last edited by RahRah; 07-09-2019, 01:44 PM.

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                • #98
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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by RahRah View Post
                    Imagination is more important than knowledge.

                    So, while knowledge is useful, and likely needed to complete a solve, imagination takes precedence.

                    THINK

                    Thinking versus knowing.

                    Think(ing) is more important than know(ing).

                    I've said many times I believe there is something we are to find, in addition to the chest; something that will expose a truth. We do not need to "know" what this is, but we need to think about how to connect the dots to get to where Fenn wants us to go, and that is done by thinking - using our imagination - reflecting upon what he's provided, becoming aware of what he's saying without saying overtly, envisioning what he is saying, painting our own picture, in our mind, of what he is giving us to work with....words.

                    Not many want to discuss, in any real detail, where warm waters halt. That's unfortunate.

                    Fenn provides lots of examples for the clues (IMO).

                    One example - where warm waters halt, waterfall - he's said "warm" means "comfortable" to him, so if you're out on the water and it's comfortable/warm, it's easy going, calm....where does that halt/stop or change? Perhaps at a waterfall, where the calmer running water now courses over the edge into a raging force of water?

                    If you close your eyes, you can see it clearly - you're going along, then suddenly it's dangerous, raging water, pouring over the edge.....what do you call that? A waterfall, sheer drop, bluff, crag, cliff, cascade, etc. - take your pick, you have something to start with.

                    Another example - where warm waters halt, river bathing - where the hot and cold water meet in the middle, Fenn describes avoiding the hot water and staying in the middle, where it is warm, where it is comfortable to just be and relax. Again, if you close your eyes, you can imagine being in that water, where it is warm, where it is comfortable, and why you'd try to stay there and avoid the scalding hot water on one side and the frigid cold water on the other side.....what do you call that? You're in the center, at the happy medium, at the midpoint, middle course, between two extremes, it's half and half - half hot, half cold, you're floating and free in the warm water.

                    Those are just two examples, there are many more to consider too (IMO).
                    WWWH has been discussed many times on all forums discussing Forrest Fenn topics. Forrest even gave the first WWWH which is Continental Divide. people don't get it because they have a particular notion to such place. Such as they could envision a profile of a mountain. No, the key word in the name is "Divide" and is a top down view of the mountain with particular attention to the highest point. There is a separation of waters that occur there. It is quite long so then a person has to narrow down the precise spot. How is that done ? Think postage stamp. How does a letter get to the proper address ? Hmmm, there is a reason for post marks.

                    Comment


                    • “Our greatest currency is our time and we cannot save it. Spend it wisely and never waste another's or your own.”
                      ― Kyle Barger

                      Comment


                      • “We would rarely waste time if it were earned.”
                        ― Mokokoma Mokhonoana

                        Comment


                        • In the end, a “waste of time” is: time spent doing something that you don’t really value.

                          It is a theme throughout TTOTC.

                          Things that provide genuine personal value to you are not a waste a time. Others may see your use of your time as a 'waste of time' because it is something that provides them no interest/value; the only difference is in what provides genuine value to you, not them. Also is the concept that if what you do (work, volunteering) is valued by others, because they value what you're doing - that's not a waste of time either.

                          Successful people try to minimize the time and money they spend on things that do not provide genuine value to them or to others. They also look for ways to spend their time and money on things that provide more value to them or to others than whatever it is they’re currently doing.

                          This requires focus.

                          ...tarry scant...waste time...

                          Comment


                          • But
                            ...tarry scant....waste time
                            WITH
                            ...marvel gaze....stare at something wonderful, gaze at the stars, dream a little dream

                            BUT waste some time daydreaming....sounds like Fenn to me!
                            Last edited by RahRah; 07-12-2019, 08:27 PM.

                            Comment


                            • I keep posting about time and wasting time and the value of one's time because Fenn values his time a lot and part of what he's learned over the year, I believe, is that how you value your time is what matters more than what others think you should do with your time.

                              We know from TTOTC that his father did not value Fenn's time collecting things - he bought all the bottle caps because he saw Fenn's quest to collect the caps himself as a waste of time; Fenn's ball of string disappeared, no one knew where it went, no one talked about it - his father saw it as a waste of time. thus the ball of string disappeared - Fenn could no longer waste his time tying the strings on the ball and have it grow even larger.

                              When Fenn was in the military, his time was no longer his own, he was on a regimented schedule and had to stay on schedule. When he retired, he threw his watch in the field - it was an act to take back control of his time on his terms; it's why he woke each morning and laid in bed for an hour, thinking, because to him that one hour was a valuable use of his time!

                              When his wife watched Dancing with the Stars, Fenn made his bells & jars - to him watching TV just for entertainment wasn't how he wanted to spend his time, but he shows he was okay with his wife using her time watching - he valued that she chose to spend her time watching television, while he valued his time making his bells & jars. The same can be said of their vacations alone sometimes - she did her thing (doing what she valued), while he did his thing (doing what he valued) and over decades, that mutual respect for each other's time wasn't threatening to the other, it worked for them because they both understood each other's value of time and each other.

                              Comment


                              • The poem is a map: read the poem, read the book, go back to the poem and read it again. Obviously not a direct quote, but basically what Fenn has said again and again.

                                Why?

                                For most, until very recently, understanding and using a map to find your way was like a second language. Recent advances in technology, where we have satellite access to images, the ground and roads, etc., means that the "ground knowledge" once taken for granted is now regarded as less precise, less useful, and more costly; so step-by-step, slowly, we begin to rely more on the technological and turn away from the traditional use of maps. While we gather ever more technological precision, at each extension of scale, detailed place-based knowledge gained over generations is lost, and wisdom mislaid.

                                Fenn's poem attempts to get us to focus on locality, the smallest arena in which life is played out. This is the local, the actual place, where the reference is reality, indifference is unusual, detachment is difficult. For Fenn, this is a place where values and facts act upon each other and are passed on to us to create wisdom about nature, about living, dying and remembering. It implies people and place together, to keep us grounded.

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